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PROMOTING EXCELLENCE IN NYC MULTI-FAMILY BUILDING OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

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CARBON MONOXIDE

Today, Carbon Monoxide (CO) is the most commonly encountered and pervasive poison in our environment. It is responsible for more deaths than any other single poison, and for enormous suffering and morbidity in those who survive.

Annually, due to CO exposure:

  • Tens of thousands of people seek medical attention or lose several days of normal activity
  • More than 500 people die through unintentional exposure
  • As many a 2000 people commit suicide using CO

It has been known for many years that CO poisoning can produce lasting health harm, mainly through its destructive effects on the central nervous system. Some studies found that 25-40% of people died during acute exposure, while 15-40% of the survivors suffered immediate or delayed neuropsychological deficit.

Now, an emerging body of evidence suggests that longer exposures to lower levels of CO, ie. chronic CO poisoning, are capable of producing a myriad of debilitating residual effects that may continue for days, weeks, months and even years. See article:
Carbon Monoxide Detectors - Notes on CO.

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